Archive for June, 2010

Ryan Sands on What Makes Indie Manga Indie

Posted by on June 24th, 2010 at 4:18 AM
As part of the Komikusu roundtable, Ryan Sands talks about indie manga here, indie manga there, and whether and where the two meet.

Journalista for June 24, 2010: Uncle Dirk’s storytime

Posted by on June 24th, 2010 at 3:53 AM

Once upon a time, Old Uncle Dirk fell behind on his deadlines. He dragged the third part of that 2006 Eddie Campbell interview across the finish line around 1:30 in the morning, and realized there wasn't a hope in hell of getting any blogging done without greeting the morning sun in the process, and he just rolled a cigarette and gave up.

I did, however, want to acknowledge something that I missed yesterday: In the process of rolling out its new iTunes comics app, DC Comics also committed a 26-issue miniseries, Justice League: Generation Lost, to same-day digital release. (Chris Sims tries out the app; David Brothers sings its praises.) It's too soon to tell if this will lead to a serious roll-out of same-day titles any time soon, but within the confines of an argument that's rolled -- rolllllllled! -- across this blog over the past month or so, I should certainly note that Sean T. Collins turned out to be right.

DC Comics, of all people. Who saw that one coming?

The Eddie Campbell Interview (part three of four)

Posted by on June 24th, 2010 at 1:35 AM
The third installment of an extensive four-part interview with the author of The King Canute Crowd, The Fate of the Artist and co-creator of From Hell, originally published in The Comics Journal #273.

Pages: 1 2 3

G. Willow Wilson Interview conducted by Ian Burns Part Two (of Three)

Posted by on June 24th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
In Part Two of a three-part interview, Wilson talks about how it's harder to break into comics than The New York Times, writing superhero books in continuity, and how she scripts.

GutterGeek Column: WEDNESDAY SHOP TALK

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 11:17 PM

Wednesday Shop Talk

A few weeks ago, the last issue of Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti, and Amanda Conner’s run on Power Girl shipped. I was looking forward to that issue because I truly enjoyed almost every bit of that book, but I hated that it was the last issue featuring that creative team. The whole point of the Power Girl series (a creatively peaking, truly collaborative artistic team directing a great character with worlds of potential) seemed to have vanished after the publication of #12. After having just read #13 (written by Judd Winick) tonight, I can say with regret that my suspicions were accurate. As good as Sami Basri’s art is, this series should have ended at 12 issues. The fate of Power Girl has gotten me thinking about DC’s track record when it comes to periodical publications. As it turns out, 12 is about as close as it gets to a magic number for this company....

G. Willow Wilson Interview conducted by Ian Burns Part One (of Three)

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 1:50 PM
“I’m a comic-book writer who wears a headscarf,” says G. Willow Wilson.”That should be a contradiction.” Indeed, in a time when the news is riddled with stories about violence over cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, and the ties between the West and the Middle East are increasingly strained, those characteristics could easily be dismissed as conflicting. But Wilson chooses to write not only about how the West and the Middle East conflict, but how they complement each other. Wilson made her debut in the comics medium with her book Cairo, which she collaborated on with artist M.K. Perker (and with whom she is currently collaborating on their ongoing Vertigo series, Air). Originally from Colorado, Wilson now splits her time between Seattle, Wash., and Cairo, Egypt. In her new memoir, The Butterfly Mosque, she shares her love of Islam; how she became immersed in Egyptian life; and the difficulties she had reconciling her love for both Western and Middle Eastern culture. During their recent interview in Seattle, which took place on June 11, 2010, Wilson spoke to Ian Burns about her career thus far, her experiences in the comics industry and a concept she calls “hyperpraxis.”

Journalista for June 23, 2010: Any landing you can walk away from

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 1:01 PM
R.K. Laxman recovering after multiple strokes ♦ DC Comics launches iTunes app ♦ more

The Eddie Campbell Interview (part two of four)

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 11:57 AM
The second installment of an extensive four-part interview with the author of The King Canute Crowd, The Fate of the Artist and co-creator of From Hell, originally published in The Comics Journal #273.

Pages: 1 2 3

Peggy Burns on D&Q’s Success With Gekiga

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 11:18 AM

The HU roundtable on marketing art manga continues with a brief letter from Peggy Burns of D&Q.

How I Met the Godfather

Posted by on June 23rd, 2010 at 9:08 AM
An Offer We Simply Can’t Refrain From Mentioning

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