Archive for September, 2010

New Books From Scholastic

Posted by on September 15th, 2010 at 5:51 AM

Rob reviews two new books from children’s publisher Scholastic: Amulet Volume 3: The Cloud Searchers, by Kazu Kibuishi; and Bone: Tall Tales, by Jeff Smith & Tom Sniegoski.

Scholastic is best known as the publisher that distributes the

Journalista for Sept. 15, 2010: Where the bodies are buried

Posted by on September 15th, 2010 at 2:07 AM
Manga publisher Libre drops the hammer on BL scanlators ♦ Jeff Smith abandons Diamond Book Distributors for PGW ♦ more

Never Forget, Never Forgive

Posted by on September 15th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The Israeli cartoonist Rami Efal was recently nominated for the Ignatz Award for "Promising New Talent" for his self-published graphic novel, Never Forget, Never Forgive, which was originally serialized as a webcomic on Activatecomix.com. The book is a historical fiction set in feudal Japan and chronicles the "Great Onin War for the throne of Kyoto," a struggle between the Okumura and Miyamoto tribes, two embittered clans locked in combat for decades. Within this context, Efal explores the impact of war and its lingering after-effects on one family.

FDR and the New Deal For Beginners, by Paul Buhle, Sabrina Jones and Harvey Pekar

Posted by on September 14th, 2010 at 9:21 PM

FDR and the New Deal for Beginners. Written by Paul Buhle; comics by Sabrina Jones; afterword by Harvey Pekar. Danbury, CT: For Beginners, 2010. 160 pp; $14.99 pb; numerous black-and-white illustrations and short stories. ISBN: 978-1-934389-50-8.

The epic story

Crowds, Girls Reading Comics, and Consumerism at SPX

Posted by on September 14th, 2010 at 11:36 AM
Richard Cook shares some random thoughts on his experience at SPX. (Below, a comic by Miriam Libicki he bought there.)

Journalista for Sept. 14, 2010: Creepy Doomsday Guy redeemed

Posted by on September 14th, 2010 at 2:23 AM
Jerry Grandenetti dead ♦ update on Yemeni cartoonist Kamal Sharaf ♦ today's bad market news ♦ more

Flotsam 1

Posted by on September 14th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and the career of Dr. Mabuse illustrate the grave but transitory realization of early 20th-century European society that the inmates had mutinied and control over modern science's continent-wide asylums had been usurped by the pathological: "Modern literature — prescriptions written by patients," remarked Karl Kraus.: Mein Kampf, The Ego and Its Own, The Third Reich, and the murderously wicked fraud Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Comparative Imagery

Posted by on September 13th, 2010 at 1:25 PM
The Power of the Visual Metaphor

Minis Monday: Big Sexy

Posted by on September 13th, 2010 at 1:00 PM
While some of the offerings do their level best at more straightforward pornography (without it necessarily being, you know, straight) most are better served with sex and prominent sex integrated into the rest of human experience.

Ng Suat Tong on Yoshiharu Tsuge’s Red Flowers

Posted by on September 13th, 2010 at 6:44 AM
It's turning into a Yoshiharu Tsuge week at HU, with Ng Suat Tong contributing a lengthy essay on the great mangaka.

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