Archive for January, 2011

Next week on tcj.com

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 5:47 PM

Chris Ware talks to Matthias Wivel; R.C. Harvey looks at Smurfs creator Peyo and tells us what it means to write comics; Rob Clough and Rich Kreiner cover minis from up-and-comers such as Alexis Frederick-Frost and Colin Tedford; and our foreign correspondents on all the latest from Angoulême.

©2010 Peyo

tcj.com links Jan. 16-Jan. 28

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 5:43 PM

R.C. Harvey on comic strips and “Logic Gone Sane.”

Rob Clough concluded his three-part series on recent D&Q issues with a look at the final installment of Anders Nilsen’s Big Questions.

Parts Four, Five and Six went up of Kristian Williams series of essays on Garth Ennis’ aerial combat comics.

Rob Clough worked through his tcj.com slush pile.

R.C. Harvey looked at comic strips that tackled religious subject matter.

Rich Kreiner touted Tag Team.

Rob Clough looked at Adrian Tomine’s Scenes from an Impending Marriage through the prism of wedding-induced psychosis.

R.C. Harvey looked at some pictures.

He also praised X-9: Secret Agent Corrigan by Al Williamson and Archie Goodwin.

Rob Clough was curious about Curio Cabinet.

Matthias Wivel, Fredrik Stromberg (also here and here) and Bart Croonenborghs are serving as our foreign correspondents at Angoulême.

Bart Croonenborghs also took a side-trip through the Mountains of Madness.

Sean Michael Robinson leaves food for thought for the weekend with his analysis of The Simpsons Child Pornography case.

Sean Michael Robinson: Criminal Contexts: The Simpsons “Child” Pornography Case and Its Implications

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 2:58 PM

“Kutzner led dual lives. On one hand, he was a respected middle school teacher who led a responsible, crime-free life and, undoubtedly was a positive influence in the lives of many students. […] But in his secret life, he intentionally sought out sexually exploitive material involving young children for purposes of sexual gratification.”

– Government Sentencing Memorandum, U.S.A. v. Steven Kutzner

(c) Nonrequired Element of Offense. — It is not a required element of any offense under this section that the minor depicted actually exist. -Title 18 U.S.C. 1466A

In 2010, Steven Kutzner was working as a science teacher at Lake Hazel Middle School in Boise, Idaho. A year later, Kutzner’s in prison, where he is sentenced to remain for the next 15 months. That’s the temporary part. For the rest of his life he will be a sexual criminal in the eyes of his community. He will never start over. He will not work or volunteer with minors of any age, nor will he “reside or loiter within 300 feet of schoolyards, parks, playgrounds, arcades or other places primarily used by children under the age of 18.” Kutzner has joined the ranks of his fellow citizens Christopher Handley and Dwight Worley, all three punished for possessing visual depictions of fictional crimes against fictional characters.

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Angoulême – Platinum Meet

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 2:24 PM

Every year on Friday at the festival in Angoulême, comics historians from all over the world meet up to discuss, show off what they have accomplished since last year and just hang out and exchange ideas.

I’ve been going to …

Angoulême: Friday

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 11:31 AM

As mentioned in several places already, the big story here is the ongoing strike at L’Association (I’ve been writing about it here and here). Their booth, which is placed at the head of the big so-called Noveau monde tent (which houses all the small press publishers, fanzine emporia, etc) has a massive sign up saying “Employees on Strike,” with pamphlets out explaining the situation, and no books for sale. One speculates whether, as bad as this surely is for the publisher (in terms of sales in addition to everything else), it might also be something of a perverse, unintended PR scoop. At any rate, this particular Angoulême will surely be remembered by many as the one with l’Asso on strike.

Colombian Homages to Harvey Pekar

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 9:10 AM

Thanks in great part to the film American Splendor, Harvey Pekar has became something of an international superstar, with admirers all around the globe, including Colombia.

In a round-up of Colombian comics in 2010, comic artist and journalist Pablo

HU: The Ontology of Poop

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 7:53 AM

I use Stanley Cavell’s film theory to talk about a horse’s ass and other things (even comics!)

THE PANELISTS: Alphabetical Ayako

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 6:56 AM

The Panelists are closing out the week with the ABCs of incest, desire, and brutality. Craig takes an alphabetical approach to reading Osamu Tezuka’s Ayako.

The Comforts of Terror: Curio Cabinet

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 12:01 AM

All images ©2010 John Brodowski

A shorthand way of describing this comic is that it’s very metal. “Metal” in the very best junior-high school sense of the word, where a world of fantasies and possibilities have arisen that have a certain jagged edge to them, representative of the teenager’s simple view of the world as either awesome or deserving of scorn and/or revenge. It’s metal in the occasional id-born brutality of those fantasies. It’s metal in its sweep, and in its and unapologetic and unironic embrace of the epic, the over-the-top and the operatic. The genius of this book is the way that Brodkowski employs restraint in his narrative and patience in his pacing. He doesn’t bother to spell out what’s happening in these fantasy narratives, forcing the reader to simply accept what’s on the page and roll with it. This is not to say that his storytelling is unclear; indeed, the deliberate nature of that pacing makes his stories quite easy to follow in terms of structure. Each story has its own internal logic, no matter how screwy it may be. His control over his line is so exact yet expressive that one never questions what one is looking at, but rather why it’s happening.

THE PANELISTS: Mark Laliberte’s BRICKBRICKBRICK

Posted by on January 27th, 2011 at 6:29 PM

In a formalist-bending, medium-and-genre-twisting exercise, Derik takes a look at Mark Laliberte’s Brickbrickbrick (a book of visual poetry) and reads it as a book of comics.

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