Archive for February, 2011

Ayako by Osamu Tezuka

Posted by on February 24th, 2011 at 12:01 AM
Of the darker, more adult-oriented manga of Osamu Tezuka that Vertical Inc. have recently translated and lavishly reprinted for the English-speaking armchair reader, Ayako stands out as the most consistently enigmatic and sophisticated. Originally published in three volumes from 1972-1973, Ayako is Tezuka’s attempt at creating a realist epic by way of a spy drama.

The Black Panel SDCC ’08, feat. Dwayne McDuffie, Method Man, Faith Cheltenham, Rusty Cundieff, John Dokes, Reginald Hudlin & Denys Cowan

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 6:01 PM
In the event of comics creator Dwayne McDuffie's passing, tcj.com is posting the Black Panel from the 2008 San Diego Comic-Con from its audio archives. Fellow panel participants were rapper Method Man, poet Faith Cheltenham, director Rusty Cundieff, John Dokes (Marvel) and BET's Reginald Hudlin and Denys Cowan.

Only in the Comics

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 2:29 PM
What Cartooning Can Do That No Other Medium Can

SHAZAM: The Golden Age of the World’s Mightiest Mortal

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 2:00 PM
Like most of Kidd’s work, the design draws attention to itself rather than providing an unobtrusive platform for displaying the content, a spectacular miscarriage of a book designer’s function.

David Robertson: An Interview with John Ridgway (Part Two of Two)

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 9:00 AM

"Summer Magic’ in 2000 AD #576, May 28, 1988, written by Alan McKenzie. ©Fleetway Publications. Click to view larger image

In the conclusion of this interview, John Ridgeway talks about craft and computers, his preferred modes of horror, monopoly and distribution, creator's rights and venturing into creator-owned work.

Pages: 1 2 3

Ignatz Update 3: Grotesque #4

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 5:17 AM

Rob reviews the fourth and final issue of Sergio Ponchionne’s Grotesque, a joint Fantagraphics-Coconino Press production.

Sergio Ponchionne’s conclusion to Grotesque returned to the mind-bending storytelling of the first issue, tying together loose story threads in a manner that

Hail The White Rhinoceros Part Three (of Three): Josh Simmons

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 12:01 AM
We should give it to Mel Gibson.

Pages: 1 2

Madwoman of the Sacred Heart by Jodorowsky and Mœbius

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011 at 4:00 PM

While radically different from his work in cinema, Jodorowsky’s comics are still a weird amalgam of genres and influences. His first collaboration with Mœbius, The Incal, was essentially the fool’s journey of the Tarot, written as a pseudo-religious space opera. There is an even stranger turnaround here, as Madwoman of the Sacred Heart takes the gospels and turns them into an erotic noir thriller.

The Homeland Directive

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011 at 2:00 PM

David Roberston: An Interview with John Ridgway (Part One of Two)

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011 at 9:00 AM

John Ridgway’s art confused me when I was a child. His old-school, scratchy ink lines look almost as if they are not strong enough to support the characters and environments they portray, as if they are about to cave in on themselves. When his art was trailed in the “Next Issue ...” blurb in issue #8 of Marvel U.K.’s Transformers, I thought it looked pretty weak. Up to this point, the comic had been reprinting the bombastic artwork from the U.S. comic, all crash bang wallop. This Ridgway panel showed a subdued image of a robot ... strolling out from under a tree. His work should be the least suited to depicting the science-fiction worlds of Doctor Who, Transformers or Zoids, but inexplicably it works — perfectly.

Before I became aware of his work in these comics, Ridgway had already been drawing for more than a decade on titles such as Warrior and Commando. (His work continues to appear in the latter to this day.) With his expertise in creating atmospheres to the fore, his style also lends itself to fantasy tales, such as Summer Magic (a proto-Harry Potter type story published in the 1980s). His unique take on Marvel’s The Incredible Hulk, and establishing the template for DC’s Hellblazer made his reputation in American comics.

I found Ridgway extremely open as an interviewee. He surprised me on a few occasions with his opinions and how forthright he was with them. It made for an interesting chat.

David Robertson

Click to view larger image. "Hunger" in Hellblazer #1 (January 1988), written by Jamie Delano. ©1988 DC Comics Inc.

Pages: 1 2 3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10