Alternative posts

Eric Reynolds Talks About Mome, an Anthology for the 21st Century with Chris Mautner Part 1 of 2

Posted by on December 29th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The release of the 20th volume of Mome (which happily coincided with its fifth anniversary) seemed as good a time as any to talk with Reynolds about the series, where it’s been, how it’s changed and where he hopes to take it in the future. Plus, it provided an opportunity to talk with Reynolds, who has always been thoughtful, upfront, and insightful whenever I’ve had the luck to talk to him about comics. I hope I get the chance to do so again sometime soon.

Lo-Fi: Uptight #4

Posted by on December 27th, 2010 at 5:57 AM

Rob reviews the 4th issue of Jordan Crane’s one-man anthology, Uptight (Fantagraphics).

Uptight #4 is an example of that increasingly-rare animal: a satisfying alt-comic book.  At $3.95 and 36 pages, it’s actually a better bargain than a mainstream comic (especially

Grim Tidings: Miss Don’t Touch Me, Vol 2

Posted by on December 22nd, 2010 at 5:45 AM

Rob reviews the second volume of Miss Don’t Touch Me, written by Hubert and drawn by the art team of Kerascoet (NBM).

The first volume of Miss Don’t Touch Me was part murder-mystery, part “erotic thriller”, part workplace procedural and

Genre Is The New Steady-State II: Werewolf!!!

Posted by on December 18th, 2010 at 5:38 AM

Rob reviews the anthology Werewolf!!!, edited by Penina Gal, Josh Rosen, Betsey Swardlick and Nick Patten.

Werewolf!!!, is the third volume from a team of cartoonists from the Center For Cartoon Studies. The first and second volumes of

Sympathy and Ambivalence: Artichoke Tales

Posted by on December 16th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
Megan Kelso's first full-length graphic novel, Artichoke Tales, raises the stakes seen in her short stories and makes the relationships between three generations of characters one of simultaneous longing and resentment. The reserved nature of her characters masks seething and churning emotions that emerge in ways that aren't necessarily healthy or rational. The reserve of her present-day characters is juxtaposed against the outsized behavior of historical figures whose story is told as a way of explaining present-day circumstances. This story is entirely about relationships, both familial and romantic. At the same time, it's also about one's relationship to one's country, one's religion, and one's ethnicity, and the ways in which resorting to war to solve conflicts changes all of these relationships irrevocably. Make no mistake: this is not a book with an explicit anti-war message. Rather, it's one that asks the reader to think about what war does to its participants, not the least of which are its soldiers.

Genre Is The New Steady-State I: Elf World #1

Posted by on December 15th, 2010 at 6:47 AM

Rob reviews the first of three new alt-genre anthologies: Elf World #1, edited by Francois Vigneault.

Elfworld #1, edited by Francois Vigneault.  The first volume of this anthology was released three years ago, and it was one of the

CBGB

Posted by on December 15th, 2010 at 12:01 AM


Everyone there has his or her story, and it’s these tales that this anthology sets out to tell. Not to mourn the loss of the legendary New York club (closed since 2006), but to show what made it such a vital part of musical history for the people who went there. CBGB’s accepted all-comers and for that group of misfits, weirdos and outcasts, it wasn’t just about the music —it was so much more — it was the people, the stories, the sense of adventure. It was life lived urgently.

Hyperreal: The Lodger

Posted by on December 4th, 2010 at 6:05 AM

Rob reviews Karl Stevens’ recent book, The Lodger (Karl Stevens Art Publishing).

Karl Stevens made a mark in the comics world a few years ago with his hyper-realistically rendered, Xeric-grant winning comic Guilty.  While most cartoonists try to create

Newave!; The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s

Posted by on December 3rd, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The chief surprise with Newave! is the vitality and merit it sustains throughout its length and not so much in its content, although there is a lot of content … well over 70 complete minis from the day. This is altogether riveting stuff, a host of guerilla comics from so many different hands offering an astonishing variety of visual experiences.

Quick Comments On Series: Shiot Crock, Big Questions, Nurse Nurse, Boneyard

Posted by on November 27th, 2010 at 6:53 AM

Rob offers some quick words on the newest iterations of various series: Shiot Crock #16 edited by Shannon Smith, Boneyard Volume 7 by Richard Moore (NBM), Nurse Nurse #7 by Katie Skelly, and Big Questions #14, by Anders Nilsen (Drawn

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