Essay posts

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part Six: Actor and Image

Posted by on May 24th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, Part Five.

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part Five: Revealing Corruption

Posted by on May 21st, 2010 at 12:01 AM
Internal illustrations for The Picture of Dorian Gray face challenges similar to those of the cover designs, plus the added need to portray gradual corruption in the painted image.

Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four.

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part Four: The Double Image

Posted by on May 20th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
It takes a special audacity to try to illustrate The Picture of Dorian Gray.

The Picture of Dorian Gray and Other Writings

Part One, Part Two, Part Three.

Pages: 1 2

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part Three: Beardsley, Russell and Salomé

Posted by on May 19th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The artist who has, without rival, done the most to bring Wilde's work into comics is P. Craig Russell. He has adapted four volumes of Wilde's fairy tales, including The Happy Prince and The Selfish Giant. Russell's adaptations are really very good, and they demonstrate his range as a comics artist. His images are elegant and subtle, with careful detail and even weight, when it's called for; and they are rounder and more playful, more cartoonish, when that suits the story better. He quietly shifts along this scale, finding just the right pitch, and adjusting the visual style frequently within a given story, or sometimes, even, on a single page. Russell also did a version of Salomé for the third volume of his Opera Adaptations. Part One, Part Two.

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part Two: The Cartoons of Dorian Gray

Posted by on May 18th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
The last couple years have given us four comics adaptations of The Picture of Dorian Gray. The first is a French volume, Le Portrait de Dorian Gray, d’Oscar Wilde, adapted by Stanislas Gros and published by Delcourt in June 2008. The second, the Marvel Illustrated edition, scripted by Roy Thomas and drawn by Sebastian Fiumara, appeared in hardcover later that year. The third, adapted by Ian Edginton and illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard, was published by Sterling just a few weeks after the Marvel edition. The fourth, appearing in a Graphic Classics collection of Wilde stories, was scripted by Alex Burrows with art by Lisa K. Weber. It was published by Eureka in early 2009. Part One.

I am the Other Side of Ken Smith’s Brain

Posted by on May 17th, 2010 at 7:42 PM
There's something you should know about me . . .

Pictures of Dorian Gray, Images of Oscar Wilde; Part One: The Power of Image

Posted by on May 17th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
oscar_wilde_portraitIn this nine-part essay, I examine various efforts to visually represent Dorian Gray, especially in comics, and I consider the multiple depictions of Wilde in cartoons going back as far as 1882. These two projects have more in common than it might first seem. Wilde was especially interested in the idea of "image"—that is, in visual and narrative presentations of the self. Hence his emphasis on surface, style and physical beauty: but also, his fascination with secrecy, concealment and double lives. These themes, which occupy so prominent a role in Wilde's fiction and drama, were also the dominant notes of his life. And in both spheres he played freely, dangerously, with the distinction between reality and representation, between life and art.

Fantasy’s Michelangelo: An Appreciation

Posted by on May 14th, 2010 at 2:47 PM
Ken Smith's 1994 (TCJ #174) appreciation of Frazetta examines the artist in the larger context of fantasy illustrators and his heritage.

Point-Counterpoint: Gavin Lees’ Concluding Kick-Ass Argument

Posted by on May 13th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Point-Counterpoint: Simon Abrams’ Concluding Kick-Ass Argument

Posted by on May 13th, 2010 at 12:00 AM

It's interesting that you should mention the Crank movies because they're, to my mind, the cinematic equivalent of everything that Millar's recent creator-owned series have tried and failed to be.

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