Interviews posts

The Eli Valley Interview

Posted by on September 1st, 2010 at 7:35 AM

Eli Valley is a New York-based cartoonist and writer whose remarkable comic strip, Comics Rescued From a Burning Synagogue in Bialystok and Hidden in a Salt Mine Until After the War, appears each month in the pages of the

Inside DMC with Johnny Ryan

Posted by on August 30th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
I needed more material if I was ever going to publish something on DMC. After weeks of feeling dejected about the curt interview, about failing to break through the professional wall and become a buddy, I put down the boxed wine, paused my Tori Amos CD, wrapped a metal-plated sash around my forehead, channeled my nine-tail demon fox and started working on this interview again. One day my nine-tailed demon fox (friend and collaborator Ryan Sands) told me his nine-donged spirit animal (friend and collaborator Johnny Ryan) was a die-hard fan of Detroit Metal City. A few e-mails later, we’d had this conversation.

GutterGeek: CHRIS REILLY AND FRED HEMBECK

Posted by on August 28th, 2010 at 7:48 PM

Over at GutterGeek, Chris Reilly interviews Fred Hembeck. Thankfully, they cover a lot more material than just swirly knees. Hembeck discusses his early days as a cartoonist but also talks about the difficulties of freelance gigs in today's marketplace. Chris then runs down a few new books from last week.

GutterGeek: CHRIS REILLY AND EVAN DORKIN

Posted by on August 22nd, 2010 at 8:57 PM

Over at GutterGeek, Chris Reilly interviews Evan Dorkin. Chris confronts the limitations of mail interviews, while Evan confronts the difficulties of his experience with Cartoon Network's Adult Swim. And both talk about Milk and Cheese and Evan's recent success in Dark Horse's Beasts of Burden. After the interview, Chris runs down some recent monthly books and eviscerates Neal Adams' Batman: Odyssey. (Because honestly, that's the only reasonable response besides simply ignoring it.)

Porn, Piracy and Manga’s Revolutionary Summer

Posted by on August 19th, 2010 at 7:06 AM
summer of manga Roland Kelts tackles the issues surrounding scanlations.

Studio Profile: Hope Street Studios

Posted by on August 16th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
Earlier this year, I looked at the wealth of interesting small-press publications that were emerging from Scotland. It became apparent that the majority of the work was coming from one studio — Hope Street Studios in Glasgow — where professional creators like Jamie Grant, Frank Quitely, Gary Erskine and Dominic Regan had formed a creative nexus with emerging independent artists and writers. When the opportunity arose, I decided to visit the studio and speak to the various creators associated with it about the community that Hope Street has fostered as well as their influences, aspirations and the uniquely bleak Scottish sense of humor.

More information on the creators and publications featured can be found at the following locations: Dominic Regan: Gamma Head John Miller: Evil Wee Comics Graham Murdoch: Lambiek profile Iain Laurie: Powwkipsie and Black Cape Craig Collins: Roachwell Wasted, Northern Lightz and Nexion: Bad Press Ltd.

Craft of Comics: Jamie Grant (Part 2 of 2)

Posted by on August 12th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
Previously: Part One of "Craft of Comics: Jamie Grant." Jamie Grant made his first impression in comics with his run on Missionary Man in 2000 A.D. (following on from Frank Quitely with whom he would make frequent collaborations over the years). Since then he has become known more as colorist on titles like We3, All-Star Superman (both with Frank Quitely), Hellblazer and Supergirl. This two-part video series takes us through the digital coloring process and Grant explains his no-nonsense approach to comics art. In this second part, he demonstrates the toning and rendering process for a cover of Supergirl while ruminating on super-shorts and super-acne.

Craft of Comics: Jamie Grant (Part 1 of 2)

Posted by on August 11th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
Previously in Lees' "Craft of Comics" video series: Frank Quitely. Jamie Grant made his first impression in comics with his run on Missionary Man in 2000 A.D. (following on from Frank Quitely, with whom he would make frequent collaborations over the years). Since then he has become known more as colorist on titles like We3, All-Star Superman (both with Frank Quitely), Hellblazer and Supergirl. In this two-part video series, he takes us through the digital coloring process and explains his no-nonsense approach to comics art. This first part concerns the preliminary stages of preparing a cover of Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters, why he hates RGB color and how to spot the mistakes in his work.

Tomorrow: the conclusion to "Craft of Comics: Jamie Grant."

SDCC 10: International Comics and Graphic Novels Panel

Posted by on August 10th, 2010 at 1:00 PM
Tom Spurgeon moderates a panel with Moto Hagio (Japan: A Drunken Dream), Milo Manara (Italy: X-Men) and Kathryn and Stuart Immonen (Canada: Moving Pictures). Emile Bravo (France: My Mommy is in America and she Met Buffalo Bill) joins in.

Craft of Comics: Frank Quitely

Posted by on August 9th, 2010 at 12:01 AM
This is the first part in a series of videos by Gavin Lees called "The Craft of Comics."

In The Comics Journal #300, Frank Quitely (We3, Flex Mentallo, Batman and Robin) spoke at length with Dave Gibbons on new innovations in creating comics digitally. Of particular note was their enthusiasm for Wacom's Cintiq pen display which they had both used to great effect in their recent work. In the following video, Quitely demonstrates how he uses his Cintiq to improve his workflow with traditional media and takes us through some of the preliminary steps in creating a cover for the relaunch of T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents for DC Comics (see the finished version above).

Lees' "Craft of Comics" series continues on Wednesday, Aug. 11, with the first of a two-parter featuring Jamie Grant.

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