Manga posts

Disaster and distance

Posted by on April 10th, 2011 at 8:07 PM
Hokusai, 1833
Hokusai’s “Great Wave off Kanagawa,” 1833

I was in Oregon when the quake and wave first struck Japan last month. More specifically, I was in a little comfort food eatery called Belly in downtown Eugene, sipping a martini.

A Single Match by Oji Suzuki

Posted by on February 17th, 2011 at 12:01 AM

Drawn & Quarterly’s series of newly-translated gekiga offers some elegaic comics by Oji Suzuki.

…also: What on earth is happening in this panel?!

Anime/Manga Porn Battle Heats Up in Japan

Posted by on January 20th, 2011 at 6:02 PM

The battle in Japan over pornography censorship Bill 156 is intensifying. Last month, media companies Kadokawa Group Publishing and Animate jointly announced they would take their wares away from Gov. Ishihara’s Tokyo Anime Fair and host their own simultaneous event, “The Anime Contents Expo.” Several other major publishers and producers are joining them.

Naoki Urasawa’s “Billy Bat”

Posted by on December 29th, 2010 at 12:13 PM

I chanced being in Japan to pick  up volume 4 of Naoki Urasawa and Takashi Nagasaki’s “Billy Bat” this month. The premise and conceit of the series are so fascinating I was surprised not to see more written about it. …

Looking back to move forward: A few good gift books

Posted by on December 21st, 2010 at 5:32 AM

Given such dire prognostications for the near future, it may be better, or at least more fun, to look back at a few of 2010’s gift-worthy Japanese pop culture pubs.

Cool Japan chilled: Censorship rules Japan

Posted by on December 15th, 2010 at 7:10 AM

Any of you remember the ‘Comics Code’ in America, effectively shutting down the most creative comics artists in the US in the 1950s, as aptly recorded by David Hadju in The Ten Cent Plague? For the sake of all of us, let’s hope it doesn’t happen in Japan.

Manga vs Comics: Does it matter? Felipe Smith in Japan

Posted by on December 10th, 2010 at 11:45 AM

Can an American artist and his Japanese agent break down the walls of prejudice in both East and West?

AltCom 2010

Posted by on November 16th, 2010 at 1:45 PM

The AltCom weekend is over, and I must say that I am very pleased with how it all turned out. We’ve had a festival for kids and kids’ comics in Malmö for about ten years now, but this was the first all-out adult comics festival and it drew a fair number of visitors, some really interesting guests from all over the world, many publishers and so on.

Impact City review by Jason Thompson

Posted by on November 10th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Impact City, a manga by French mangaka Nekozumi, promises a better read because it’s specifically designed for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Unlike the jillions of scanlated analog manga available online or on apps like MangaDL and MangaRock, each panel fits into the iPhone landscape view (there is no portrait view support) so you won’t need to scroll and zoom to read the manga on a tiny screen: “No more zooming!” the app description boasts. “The TDC™ (True Digital Comic) Technology developed by Mangako gives the opportunity for digital creators and story tellers, to build a project that fits into the device it is meant to be read on.” If that were all, though, it wouldn’t be very different from the iPhone comics from companies like Tokyopop and NTT Solmare, which fit manga into one iPhone-screen-sized panel at a time, the equivalent of panning-and-scanning old movies from widescreen to 3:4 ratio. In Tokyopop and NTT Solmare’s digital comics, the reader taps the screen to go from panel to panel. The real distinction of Impact City is that, instead of flipping the pages by hand, the comic plays automatically, like a slideshow. You can drag a slider to go forward or back among the panels, but there’s no preview image to show which panel you’re aiming for, and once the art appears on the screen, there’s no way to stop the story from ‘playing'; all you can do is adjust the playback speed, from “Very slow” to “Fast.” Dialogue balloons appear and disappear on the screen, and a few camera movements and limited animations are mixed with the 2D, black-and-white slideshow.

More Dark Fancy From Colleen Frakes

Posted by on October 9th, 2010 at 5:38 AM

Rob kicks off a month of reviewing various comics related to students from the Center For Cartoon Studies by looking at Tragic Relief #8 and #9, by Colleen Frakes.

Much like Eleanor Davis, Colleen Frakes is building up a body …

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10