Review posts

Other Lives: The Night Bookmobile

Posted by on February 9th, 2011 at 12:01 AM
The Night Bookmobile is a sweet, haunting tale, simply told and plainly illustrated. The story is an old one, of a girl who seeks an escape in stories, and finds it.

Assorted Miscellany: Candy Or Medicine, Devil’s Lake, Desmond Reed minis, Dina Kelberman, The Cornelia Collection

Posted by on February 7th, 2011 at 5:39 AM
Rob offers quick takes on comics in a variety of media: the webcomics content of Devil's Lake; minicomics by Desmond Reed, The Corneila Collection by Kel Crum; Candy Or Medicine #12, edited by Josh Blair; and the latest issue of The Regular Man, by Dina Kelberman.

D&Q Classics, Part III: Nipper, 1963-1964

Posted by on February 5th, 2011 at 5:28 AM

Rob concludes his look at Drawn & Quarterly’s reprints of classic comic books and strips with Doug Wright’s Nipper (1963-1964).

I love that Drawn & Quarterly will occasionally remind its readers that it is still a fundamentally Canadian comics publisher. 

D&Q Classics, Part II: Tubby, Volume 1

Posted by on February 2nd, 2011 at 6:24 AM
In the second of a three-part series on classic comic books and strips released by Drawn & Quarterly, Rob looks at Tubby, written and drawn by John Stanley, with additional art by Lloyd White.

Minicomics: Ford, Frederick-Frost, Freibert

Posted by on January 29th, 2011 at 5:09 AM

Rob reviews Only Skin #6, by Sean Ford; Mr. Cellar’s Attic, by Noel Freibert; and Courtship of Ms. Smith, by Alexis Frederick-Frost.

Only Skin #6, by Sean Ford. Ford’s series will be collected by Secret Acres

THE PANELISTS: Alphabetical Ayako

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 6:56 AM

The Panelists are closing out the week with the ABCs of incest, desire, and brutality. Craig takes an alphabetical approach to reading Osamu Tezuka's Ayako.

The Comforts of Terror: Curio Cabinet

Posted by on January 28th, 2011 at 12:01 AM

All images ©2010 John Brodowski

A shorthand way of describing this comic is that it's very metal. "Metal" in the very best junior-high school sense of the word, where a world of fantasies and possibilities have arisen that have a certain jagged edge to them, representative of the teenager's simple view of the world as either awesome or deserving of scorn and/or revenge. It's metal in the occasional id-born brutality of those fantasies. It's metal in its sweep, and in its and unapologetic and unironic embrace of the epic, the over-the-top and the operatic. The genius of this book is the way that Brodkowski employs restraint in his narrative and patience in his pacing. He doesn't bother to spell out what's happening in these fantasy narratives, forcing the reader to simply accept what's on the page and roll with it. This is not to say that his storytelling is unclear; indeed, the deliberate nature of that pacing makes his stories quite easy to follow in terms of structure. Each story has its own internal logic, no matter how screwy it may be. His control over his line is so exact yet expressive that one never questions what one is looking at, but rather why it's happening.

THE PANELISTS: Mark Laliberte’s BRICKBRICKBRICK

Posted by on January 27th, 2011 at 6:29 PM

In a formalist-bending, medium-and-genre-twisting exercise, Derik takes a look at Mark Laliberte's Brickbrickbrick (a book of visual poetry) and reads it as a book of comics.

X-9: Secret Agent Corrigan by Al Williamson and Archie Goodwin, introduction by Mark Schultz

Posted by on January 27th, 2011 at 12:01 AM
Corrigan is virtually a textbook lesson, day by day, of how to do a continuity newspaper comic strip.

Party Favor: Scenes From An Impending Marriage

Posted by on January 26th, 2011 at 6:29 AM

Rob reviews the new comic from Adrian Tomine, Scenes From An Impending Marriage (Drawn & Quarterly).

Halfway through reading Adrian Tomine’s new release, Scenes From An Impending Marriage, I was baffled.  This comic was certainly funny and strangely sweet in

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