Top Stories posts

Jason Shiga on Interactive Comics (with video)

Posted by on March 1st, 2011 at 12:01 AM

On his recent West Coast tour with Aaron Renier, Shiga gave a presentation on how his work has evolved over the last 10 years and gave some enlightening glimpses into his working methods. I spoke to him afterwards and had him take me through the workings of his unfinished masterpiece, Theater Eroika.

Hail The White Rhinoceros Part Three (of Three): Josh Simmons

Posted by on February 23rd, 2011 at 12:01 AM

We should give it to Mel Gibson.

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David Roberston: An Interview with John Ridgway (Part One of Two)

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011 at 9:00 AM

John Ridgway’s art confused me when I was a child. His old-school, scratchy ink lines look almost as if they are not strong enough to support the characters and environments they portray, as if they are about to cave in on themselves. When his art was trailed in the “Next Issue …” blurb in issue #8 of Marvel U.K.’s Transformers, I thought it looked pretty weak. Up to this point, the comic had been reprinting the bombastic artwork from the U.S. comic, all crash bang wallop. This Ridgway panel showed a subdued image of a robot … strolling out from under a tree. His work should be the least suited to depicting the science-fiction worlds of Doctor Who, Transformers or Zoids, but inexplicably it works — perfectly.

Before I became aware of his work in these comics, Ridgway had already been drawing for more than a decade on titles such as Warrior and Commando. (His work continues to appear in the latter to this day.) With his expertise in creating atmospheres to the fore, his style also lends itself to fantasy tales, such as Summer Magic (a proto-Harry Potter type story published in the 1980s). His unique take on Marvel’s The Incredible Hulk, and establishing the template for DC’s Hellblazer made his reputation in American comics.

I found Ridgway extremely open as an interviewee. He surprised me on a few occasions with his opinions and how forthright he was with them. It made for an interesting chat.

David Robertson

Click to view larger image. “Hunger” in Hellblazer #1 (January 1988), written by Jamie Delano. ©1988 DC Comics Inc.

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Hail The White Rhinoceros Part One (of Three): Shaun Partridge

Posted by on February 21st, 2011 at 12:01 AM

(Photo taken by K is for Kaleidoscope.)

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The Strangest Pictures I Have Seen #13

Posted by on February 16th, 2011 at 12:27 PM

There are comics that everyone agrees are brilliant but nobody seems to talk about. Usually they’re sui generis, works that came out of nowhere and inspired no imitators, little islands of imagination that fit awkwardly into any critic’s attempt …

Sean Michael Robinson: The Craft Behind Cerebus: An Interview with Gerhard (Part One of Three)

Posted by on February 14th, 2011 at 2:00 PM

In Part One (of Three) of a craft-oriented interview, Gerhard talks to Sean Michael Robinson about his learning curve on Cerebus.

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Moebius Above and Below

Posted by on February 14th, 2011 at 12:01 AM


It says something about the still fledgling status of comics as an institutionally accepted art form that the large Moebius retrospective currently on show at the Fondation Cartier in Paris (until March 15th) is the first of its kind in France. Entitled “Moebius transe-forme,” it catches up with a metamorphosis that has been ongoing since the seventies, marking his retardaire arrival as a fine artist in the public consciousness with all the requisite bells and whistles.

The Passing Scene

Posted by on February 11th, 2011 at 11:22 AM

Fraught, as usual, with comedy and exasperation

“I’ve Drawn Thousands of Comics”

Posted by on February 9th, 2011 at 4:13 PM

Said Joe Staton, celebrating his inheritance

DICK LOCHER HANGS UP HIS FEDORA

Posted by on February 7th, 2011 at 10:47 PM

After 32 years drawing and/or writing Dick Tracy

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