Journalista for Aug. 17, 2010: Uncomfortably close to home

Posted by on August 17th, 2010 at 5:48 AM

 

 

“It is the same as shoplifting or leaving a restaurant without paying the bill.”

Black Butler creator Yana Toboso,
discussing unauthorized digital translations

 

“Don’t know if it’s worse that people are putting up full scans of relatively recent comics, or that comic news sites are linking to them.”

 

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From Second Thoughts, ©2010 Niklas Asker.

 

Recently posted to our homepage:

  • Rob Clough reviews the debut graphic novel from Niklas Asker, Second Thoughts.
  •  

  • Chris Mautner reviews Megan Kelso’s Artichoke Tales.
  •  

  • Kristian Williams reviews the fourth volume of Warren Ellis and John Cassaday’s Planetary.
  •  

  • Rich Kreiner reviews Liz Prince’s I Swallowed the Key to My Heart.
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  • R.C. Harvey examines some recent editorial cartoons.
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  • GutterGeek launches a new webcomics series by Chris Reilly and Kenny Keil.
  •  

  • Over at The Hooded Utilitarian, Ng Suat Tong reviews Daren White and Eddie Campbell’s new book, The Playwright.

And in the news…

 

Above the Fold

 

Life in interesting times

  • Nathan Bomey:

    If Ann Arbor-based Borders Group Inc. is “on life support,” as New York analyst Howard Davidowitz put it last week, Borders is not ready to talk about it.

  •  


    Panel from the first Superman story in Action Comics #1, ©1938 the Estate of Jerry Siegel.

  • Ted Johnson looks at DC Comics’ lawsuit against Siegel estate lawyer Marc Toberoff. Aside from the fact that Toberoff’s lawyers have filed a request to have the case thrown out on the merits, there isn’t much in the way of new information here, but it’s a good enough piece if you want to play catch-up.

    (Link via Kevin Melrose.)

  •  

  • Thomas K. Arnold investigates China’s attempts to close the cartoon-culture gap with Japan.
  •  

  • Karen Smith Welch examines entertainment-store chain Hastings’ entry into comics retailing.
  •  

  • Avoid the Future presents a conversation with Koyama Press publisher Anne Koyama.
  •  

  • Wait — editorial cartoonist Chan Lowe is actually Carol Channing’s son? I did not know that.

 

Today’s Format WarsTM report

  • Kiel Phegley speaks with Comixology CEO David Steinberger.
  •  


    Excerpt from a recent Penny Arcade strip, ©2010 Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins.

  • The headline says it all: “Penny Arcade surprised to find that rape jokes offend people.”
  •  

  • Andrew King reviews a scanlation-aggregator app… on the website of the Washington Post.

 

Joe McCulloch: New this week

A look at the best-sounding books scheduled to hit the comics shops tomorrow.

 

 

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Graphic NYC

 

Profiles

 

  • Alexander Danner on Jim Ottaviani

    “Education is not the main goal of my books — I want them to entertain, first and foremost. I love it when people tell me they’ve learned something, and read one or more of the sources I referenced in the back of the book, of course, but whenever I have to choose between telling a better story or packing another useful fact/theory/idea/whatever into a book, story wins.”

 

  • Tim O’Shea on Megan Kelso

    “I dislike the conceit that place can be a character because I think it’s reductive and human-centric. Places are hard, unforgiving, unfeeling, kind of the opposite of human attributes — that is especially apparent in wild, harsh places like mountains and oceans. They don’t have feelings or personalities. They can be beautiful and sweet, but also violent, destructive and fatal. It is all completely amoral; the beautiful landscapes are not here to reward us, nor do natural disasters happen to punish us. They simply exist.”

 

Also

 

Reviews

 

  • Jason Michelitch on Prison Pit Book Two


    ©2010 Johnny Ryan.

    “If it seems odd that I have yet to mention the plot of the comic, it’s because I have no idea how to explain what happens. The book also purposefully leaves out story elements like motivation and exposition, and all that’s on the page is straightforward, if deranged, action.”

 

  • Andrew Wheeler on Smile

    “And nothing I can say about Smile, as an adult and a reader of graphic novels/comics for too many years, will be as strong a recommendation as that: a boy a few years younger than the main character pulled this book off the shelf, saw that it was about a girl growing up and her dental troubles, and read it all the way to the end anyway, enjoying it straight through.”

 

Also

 

Commentary

 

  • Lindsay Beyerstein: Cathy was not a feminist trailblazer

    “As a woman with a nationally syndicated comic strip and marketing empire, [Cathy] Guisewite is indeed a trailblazer. The same cannot be said of her fictional alter ego. There’s nothing feminist or trailblazing about a character who spends 34 years on a diet, marking time at work while joylessly trawling for a husband.”

 

  • Kelly Thompson: Is Wonder Woman a gateway drug? Could she be?


    Detail from a proposed manga-style Wonder Woman comic by Ben Caldwell.

    “New readers are not a luxury, but a necessity, at whatever that costs you. Plenty of media and industries are making a play for their dollars and affection, if we don’t even try, why will they bother with us?”

 

Also

 

Business and Craft

 

  • Jeff Koterba: Cartoonist loves feel of ink, paper, paint

    The Omaha World-Herald editorial cartoonist discusses the ins and outs of his job. Bonus streaming video!

    (Link via Alan Gardner.)

 

  • Gerry Giovinco: Comico first impressions

    How to launch an indy comic-book company in the early 1980s.

 

Comics and Art

 

  • Big Blog of Kids’ Comics: John Buscema’s Hercules


    Sequence from Dell Four Color #1006.

    This 1959 movie tie-in is as solid an example of a well-done adventure comic for children as you’re likely to find.

 

Also

 

Comics Culture

 

  • Inkwell Awards: 2010 voting now open

    Have your say on comic-book inkers at the link.

 

  • Laura Hudson: Pictures for Sad Children art show

    John Campbell’s recent exhibition: the perfect antidote for optimism?

 

  • Your Not-Comics Link of the Day:

    The Wall Street Journal offers a paranoia-inducing look at the many ways that marketers are tracking you on the Internet.

 

Events Calendar

 

This Week:

 

  • Aug. 18 (London, England): Bryan Lee O’Malley will be signing books and meeting readers at Gosh! Comics on Great Russell Street, from 4:30-6:30PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 18 (New York City, NY): See James Sturm in conversation with Sandee Brawarsky at the Congregation Rodeph Sholom on 83rd Street, beginning at 7:30PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 19 (San Francisco, CA): Nicole Hollander will participate in a presentation and signing at the Cartoon Art Museum on Mission Street, from 7-9PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 19 (New York City, NY): Join Gary Panter and Peter Saul for an on-stage conversation at the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art on Broadway, beginning at 7PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 19 (Montreal, Quebec): Historian and scholar Jeet Heer discusses modern comics at the Libairie Drawn & Quarterly on Bernard, beginning at 7PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 20 (London, England): Join Becky Cloonan for the opening of her new art show at Orbital Comics on Great Newport Street, beginning at 8PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 21-22 (Manila, Philippines): The Metro Comic Con happens at the SM Megamall in Mandaluyong City… is that still in Manila? I’m sitting here in Arizona, so I have no idea. Details here.
  • Aug. 21 (Minneapolis, MN): The Minneapolis Indie Xpo takes place at the Soap Factory on Second Street, from 9AM-5PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 21 (Plano, TX): The Dallas Webcomics Expo will be held at the Southfork Hotel on the Central Expressway, from 11AM-6PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 22 (New York City, NY): Join Alex Robinson, Mike Dawson and Josh Flanagan for a live taping of the Ink Panthers Show at Brooklyn’s own Bergen Street Comics, from 11AM-2PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 22 (London, England): Comica Comiket, the Independent Comics Summer Fair, takes place at the PumpHouse Gallery in Battersea Park, from noon-6PM. Details here.
  • Aug. 22 (Beverly Hills, CA): Sheldon creator Dave Kellett will celebrate the launch of his latest book with a talk, signing and free drinks at the Crescent Lounge on Crescent Drive, beginning at 9PM. Details here.

 

Want to see your comics-related event listed here? Email a link to dirk@tcj.com and let me know. Please include an online link to which I can send people for more information. No sales-only events, please — it’s nice that you’ve marked things down at your store or website, but I won’t be listing it here. (Note: Under no circumstances will I link to a Facebook page. Seriously, what idiot “advertises” their event solely on a website that requires registration to see the advertisement?)

 

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