Journalista for Dec. 22, 2010: Delinked

Posted by on December 22nd, 2010 at 4:12 AM

 

 

“Always merry and bright!”

- Henry Miller

 

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From The Revenge of Bakamé.

 

Recently posted to our homepage:

  • International comics: Bart Croonenborghs looks at Jeroen Janssen and Pieter van Oudheusden’s The Revenge of Bakamé.
  • Roland Kelts discusses a few of 2010′s gift-worthy Japanese pop-culture gift books.
  • As always, R.C. Harvey covers the funny pages.
  • Over at The Hooded Utilitarian, James Romberger discusses his longtime association with David Wojnarowicz, the artist whose work was recently at the center of a censorship controversy at the Smithsonian.

And in the news…

 

Above the Fold

 

Life in interesting times

  • In Japan, “The Daily Gendai newspaper reported on Thursday that the recently passed amendment to the Youth Healthy Development Ordinance does not apply to electronic data that is viewed on mobile sites or downloaded.” If this story has been confusing you a bit, you’re not alone. fortunately, Brian Ruh breaks it down for you.
  •  

  • Brigid Alverson speaks with Kids Can Press editors Tara Walker and Karen Li about the process of launching a graphic-novel line.

 

Today’s Format WarsTM report

  • Another webcomics content-scraper app is discovered out in the wild. Gary Tyrrell has the details.

 

Joe McCulloch: New this week

A look at the best-sounding books scheduled to hit the comics shops today.

 

 

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Graphic NYC

 

Profiles

 

 

Reviews

 

 

Commentary

 

 

Comics and Art

 

 

And finally…

 

Let’s get the important stuff out of the way first. The three best sources for comics-related news are The Comics Reporter, Robot 6 and Bleeding Cool. They span the funnybook spectrum, with Spurgeon the least concerned with Wednesday Crowd comics, Johnston the most concerned, and Robot 6 somewhere in the middle. ICv2 offers the news from a retail/distribution perspective. Down the Tubes covers the U.K., while Sequential keeps track of Canada. Alan Gardner and Michael Cavna de-emphasize comic books and graphic novels (but don’t avoid them entirely) to concentrate on other forms of cartoon art, because really, someone should, you know?

Resources: Comic Blog Updates and Update-A-Tron keep track of the comics blogosphere. Bookmark them now. The Grand Comics Database catalogues comic books, and has a handy searchable database. The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and the Hero Initiative are entirely worthy, comics-related charities. ComicsPRO is a trade organization for comics retailers. If you want to know how to make that inverted exclamation point in ¡Journalista!, you can always look it up.

Some bloggers specialize, mixing information and commentary. Bugpowder covers the U.K. small-press scene, while The Daily Cross Hatch focuses on small-press America. Daryl Cagle covers editorial cartoons. Good Comics For Kids is all about what it says on the marquee. ComixTalk and Fleen round up the webcomics news. When Fangirls Attack is a feminist comics-fan linkblogger. Graphic NYC documents the Big Apple, Strippers Guide digs into comic-strip archeology, and Neil Cohn obsesses over academic theory and experimentation.

(Edited later to add:) Almost forgot: If you want to learn about the Philippines’ long and proud komiks tradition, Gerry Alanguilan‘s the guy you want to talk to. He pretty much owns the topic. (Sorry, Gerry.)

Digging into the blogosphere, Comics Comics is easily the most essential source for commentary and criticism, with Paul Gravett in close competition. Also worth a look: Attentiondeficitdisorderly, Comics Worth Reading, The Cool Kids Table, Death to the Universe, Factual Opinion, 4th Letter, Graphic Novel Review, Read About Comics, Savage Critics and Trouble With Comics.

Anime News Network is the 800-pound gorilla of English-language Japanese pop-culture news sites, while Japanator is a smarter Anime News Network, About Manga is more user-friendly, Same Hat is just weird, Sankaku Complex is just perverted, Okazu covers yuri culture, and Manga Blog links to all of it. Also recommended: All About Manga, MangaCast, The Manga Critic, Manga Xanadu and Precocious Curmudgeon.

There are a variety of professionally run news sites catering to the great Direct Market reservation, including The Beat, Broken Frontier, ComicMix, Comics Alliance and iFanboy. Mindless Ones do commentary well.

 


 

And with that out of the way, well, there’s not a lot to say that hasn’t already been drunk-Tweeted, but let me do it sober this time.

In the last ten years, I’ve thrown away a career, assembled porn mailers, drawn comics, written essays, raised money for a homeless cartoonist, organized Seattle’s worst benefit concert ever, digitized hundreds of hours of cassette tapes containing (I think) the largest oral history of comics in the United States, started a weblog, kick-started a blogosphere, attended a bunch of geek festivals (including four San Diego Comic-Cons in a row), edited a magazine, interviewed cartoonists whom I greatly admired, got quoted in major newspapers on topics in which I was often unqualified to hold a quoteworthy opinion, became several bibliography citations, became a footnote, became an Internet micro-celebrity, became a Wikipedia entry (it reads “mostly harmless”), helped facilitate a manga line and spent a full four years working from home in my living room, naked! And I got paid to do all of it.

Jesus Christ, do I ever have nothing to complain about. It’s been a blast. Alas, it’s been obvious for some time now that the magazine can’t support a full-time blogger. I’m grateful to Gary Groth for refusing to pull the trigger for as long as he has. I’m also grateful to him and Kim Thompson for giving me the opportunity to work with people like Michael Dean, Kristy Valenti, Adam Grano, Milo George, Peppy White, Ilse Driggs, Michael Dowers, Carrie Whitney, Eric Reynolds, Greg Zura, Jen Ralston and everyone else at Fantagraphics. Working with you guys justified my existence. Thank you all for putting up with me. Thanks also to everyone who blogged, e-mailed and tweeted their best wishes. It was incredibly flattering.

My next act will be… nothing. A good two weeks of nothing, at least. Then we’ll see. But first: Nothing. After ten years, I think I’ve earned it.

FIRSTNAME@LASTNAME.com, by the way.

 

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15 Responses to “Journalista for Dec. 22, 2010: Delinked”

  1. jaylat says:

    Very, very sorry to see you go! You’ve been a part of my daily routine. Thanks so much for the posts and the parting directions. Best of luck – I know you’ll go on to great things!

  2. keops73 says:

    You will be greatly missed. I spent every morning of the past five years following this blog. It’s how I would start my day. It will be hard to find a new morning routine. Best of luck.

  3. vollsticks says:

    As two of the previous commenter’s have already said, you’ve been an essential part of my day for the two-and-a-half years I’ve been on-line. Sad to see you go! Thanks for providing such a valuable resource. All the best for the future Mr. Deppey.

    Ant

  4. [...] | Tom Spurgeon rounds up tributes/farewells to comics-blogging pioneer Dirk Deppey, who signs off this morning at Journalista! after being laid off by Fantagraphics. [The Comics Reporter] Northlanders [...]

  5. [...] Dirk’s last column has a good list of other comic sites online and a more formal farewell. Similar Posts: Editorial [...]

  6. Again, you have my utmost respect and you can add to the list of achievements ‘an inspiration’.

  7. MrJM says:

    You’ll be missed — but hopefully not for too long.

    – MrJM

  8. Rob Clough says:

    Good luck, Dirk. Like many, I owe you a debt for linking to my columns over at High-Low (both at sequart.com and my own blog site). Without that, it’s unlikely I would have gotten the tcj gig. Happy trails!

  9. [...] Fantagraphics has had to let Dirk “¡Journalista!” Deppey go as they could no longer afford a fulltime blogger. Dirk takes the opportunity of his last column to look back: In the last ten years, I’ve thrown away a career, assembled porn mailers, drew comics, wrote essays, raised money for a homeless cartoonist, organized Seattle’s worst benefit concert ever, digitized hundereds of hours of cassette tapes containing (I think) the largest oral history of comics in the United States, started a weblog, kick-started a blogosphere, attended a bunch of geek festivals (including four San Diego Comic-Cons in a row), edited a magazine, interviewed cartoonists whom I greatly admired, got quoted in major newspapers on topics in which I was often unqualified to hold a quoteworthy opinion, became several bibliography citations, became a footnote, became an Internet micro-celebrity, became a Wikipedia entry (it reads “mostly harmless”), helped facilitate a manga line and spent a full four years working from home in my living room, naked! And I got paid to do all of it. [...]

  10. [...] Dirk Deppey’s farewell post at Journalista is big-hearted and gracious, and thus out of character for the irascible sonofagun. Aw, I kid [...]

  11. [...] Deppey has been laid off from TCJ, and he was kind enough to mention us in his outgoing post. I really do appreciate that, because [...]

  12. Matthias Wivel says:

    I’m really sorry to hear this — you’ve done great work with the site, blog, magazine and, now, the manga line, plus you’ve been a constant, mindful presence on the comics internet, supporting many of us and serving as a reminder for us who write about comics to shape up or shut up.

    Thanks!

  13. [...] out of bed and heading straight to read my “news” from off the Journalista blog Mr. Deppey wrote for many years.  It was a lot of mornings thinking, “Why can’t you just eat breakfast like a normal [...]