Journalista for Feb. 19, 2010: A good day

Posted by on February 19th, 2010 at 8:24 AM

 

Journalista

 

“You guys, any day that lets me type the words devoured by Alan Moore’s sentient beard is automatically a good day.”

 

Contact me: dirk@deppey.com
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Recently posted to our homepage:

  • Douglas Wolk presents the fourth installment of his five-part interview with League of Extraordinary Gentlemen artist and co-creator Kevin O’Neill.
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  • Rich Kreiner reviews Jim Shooter & Co.’s Legion of Super-Heroes: Enemy Rising.
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  • I explain why I’m optimistic about DC Comics’ new management team.
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  • R. Fiore tells a tale of two sci-fi conventions.
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  • Not comics: Kenneth Smith continues his trip through the Cave of False Consciousness.
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  • Over at The Hooded Utilitarian, Noah Berlatsky reviews the pro-Fair Use comic, Bound by Law.

And in the news…

 

Above the Fold

 

Life in interesting times

 

Format WarsTM new-pair-of-shoes roll of the dice… lucky!

  • French lawmakers are moving forward with plans to impose an asinine censorship scheme the filtering of content upon that nation’s access to the Internet.
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  • “A federal judge said he won’t rule Thursday on a revised settlement involving Google and publisher and author groups over digital copies of books,” reports Chad Bray.
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  • Speaking of which: Yesterday’s episode of the tech-news video podcast Buzz Out Loud opens with a conversation about the Google Books settlement with Peter Brantley, co-founder of the Open Book Alliance.
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  • Texas Instruments prepares to enter the color e-reader market.
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  • Edward Nawotka asks, “Are phones more important than e-readers to the future of publishing?”

    (Link via Craig Teicher.)

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  • Leah Betancourt asks, “Can e-readers and tablets save the news?”
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  • Cory Doctorow explains why the word “free” isn’t the only thing that makes digital piracy look more attractive than legitimately purchasing a creative work.

 

Reviews

 

  • Larry Cruz on Hark! A Vagrant!


    Excerpt from the latest strip, ©2010 Kate Beaton.

     

    “While silly, a lot of these strips do make you wonder whether or not [Kate] Beaton has come close to divining the true character of several famous people.”

 

  • Brandon Soderberg on Joe the Barbarian #2

    “In sharp contrast to the leisurely paced, deceptively simple first issue of Joe the Barbarian, #2 is an extended action sequence — like if you remade that brilliant single-take war scene from Children of Men with your He-Man toys.”

 

Also

 

Commentary

 

  • Russ Maheras: Clay Geerdes on self-publishing terminology

    “I finally got my copy of Newave! The Underground Mini Comix of the 1980s the other day, and after reading it, I thought it apropo I share an exchange of letters I had with Clay Geerdes in 1988 about the subject.”

 

Comics and Art

 

  • Tom Watson (one, two, three, four and counting): Bob Foster


    Foster’s art graced the cover to Gil Kane’s groundbreaking attempt at self-publishing.

     

    Filling in for the indispensible Leif Peng, Watson has spent the week introducing us to yet another fantastic commercial artist.

 

  • Chuck Wells: “The Slumbering City”


    From Zoot Comics #11, ©1947 Fox Comics.

     

    Quite possibly the lewdest Matt Baker-drawn jungle-girl comic I’ve ever read — which is saying something. Comics Code Authority, here we come!

 

Also

 

Multimedia

 

  • Comics-related podcasts

    • Sidebar welcomes King author Ho Che Anderson as guest (23.5MB).
    • Mother Come Home cartoonist Paul Hornschemeier was recently a guest on the Chicago podcast You, Me, Them, Everybody (41.5MB, no permalinks, currently third item from the top).
    • The Comix Claptrap presents a conversation with Hicksville creator Dylan Horrocks (53.8MB).
    • This week, Panel Borders‘ Alex Fitch talks to cartoonists Darryl Cunningham and Jon Scrivens (33.8MB).
    • The website of Kurt Parsons contains short podcast interviews with Peter Kuper (11.5MB) and Steve Rude (8.6MB).
    • Jason Snell of the Industry Standard speaks with iVerse Media CEO Michael Murphey, IDW Publishing e-publishing director Jeff Webber, PanelFly CFO Brett Dovman and writer Andy Ihanatko about the possible impact of the iPad on comics (52.8MB).
    • Another week, another episode of Alex Robinson and Mike Dawson’s Ink Panthers Show, once again welcoming guest star Tony Consiglio (36.2MB).
    • For your weekly dose of criticism and commentary, here are the latest episodes of House to Astonish (40.3MB) and Fourcast (27.8MB).

    All podcasts are in downloadable MP3 audiofile format.

 

Comics Culture

 

  • Your Not-Comics Link of the Day:

    I seem to be on something of a minor “civility in political discourse” kick at the moment, so indulge me for a moment as I point to this Bloggingheads video, in which liberal Peter Beinart and conservative Jonah Goldberg present an example of just that, despite the contentious issues (Republican filibusters, Obama’s war-on-terror policy, Sarah Palin) under discussion.

 

 

Events Calendar

 

Today:

 

  • February 18-21 (Brighton, England): The Brighton Zine Fest celebrates comics, zine and DIY culture at various locations throughout the city. Details here.
  • February 19 (Albany, NY): Join cartoonists Danielle Corsetto and Jess Fink for a book signing and chance to kick their asses in laser-tag combat at Zero Gravity Lazer Tag on Central Avenue, beginning at 7PM. Laser tag! Details here.
  • February 19 (New York City, NY): From the Ashes author Bob Fingerman makes an appearance at Brooklyn’s own Rocketship on Smith Street, beginning at 8PM. Details here.

 

This Week:

 

  • February 20 (New York City, NY): A one-day exhibit entitled “The Sacred Comic Book” will mark the closing of Brooklyn art gallery Jack the Pelican on Driggs Avenue, from 7-9PM. Details here.
  • February 20 (Los Angeles, CA): The Long Beach Comic Expo takes place at the Long Beach Convention Center on Linden Avenue, from 10AM-7PM. Details here.
  • February 21 (Chapel Hill, NC): Ben Towle signs his new book Amelia Earhart: This Broad Ocean at Chapel Hill Comics on Franklin Street, from 2-4PM. Details here.

 

Want to see your comics-related event listed here? Email a link to dirk@tcj.com and let me know. Please include an online link to which I can send people for more information. No sales-only events, please — it’s nice that you’ve marked things down at your store or website, but I won’t be listing it here.

 

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6 Responses to “Journalista for Feb. 19, 2010: A good day”

  1. Nice job completely ignoring all my posts on the matter, including the only original reporting of the day, Dirk!

  2. Dirk Deppey says:

    Whoops! I forgot the “feed Heidi’s fevered ego” portion of my contract with Fantagraphics. I promise it won’t happen again.

    PS: Original reporting? You mean that thing about Karen Berger’s husband (stop the presses you bastards), or was there some other five-alarm-must-credit-The-Beat gem that I’d missed?

    Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to castigate Tom Spurgeon for failing to take my every word as Divinely Inspired Truth…

  3. So linking to relevant content qualifies as “feeding {blank’s} fevered ego”? I’ll keep that in mind. Thanks for the journalistic pointer.

  4. Dirk Deppey says:

    You’re welcome.

  5. Dirk Deppey says:

    Seriously, though: Just because you’re interested in the shuffling of every last position in an NYC comic-book company, doesn’t mean everyone shares your obsession. Also, the words “We’re also hearing” tend to lead stories that are only as trustworthy as the person delivering them.

    Didn’t Karen Berger fire you from an editorial position at Vertigo, a few years back…?

  6. For some reason I couldn’t log onto the site until now, but I think Dirk’s calm, reasonable, well-informed response speaks for itself.