Golden Age Friday: Alex Schomburg

Posted by on July 23rd, 2010 at 9:00 AM

Alex Schomburg blazes forth some more Timely superheroes. All Select was quarterly, and Wikipedia gives its run as fall 1943 thru fall 1945, so date the issues accordingly.

And away we go:


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3 Responses to “Golden Age Friday: Alex Schomburg”

  1. carlosb says:

    Are there multiple Human Torches because he can create a clone of himself? Seems one on every cover has eyes and one has a blank face. Haven’t really read any Fantastic 4, though. Maybe he does this all the time.

    I like that Bucky doesn’t get his name on the banner, even when the Sub-Mariner’s name is gone and there’s room for it.

  2. Noah Berlatsky says:

    The Human Torch who fought with Captain America against Nazis and such had a sidekick called (I think?) Toro, who had the same powers and was distinguished mostly by being shorter. I think both torches were robots or something? Anyway, this is not the same Human Torch who shows up in the Fantastic Four — the one named Johnny Storm who got his powers from cosmic rays during a space flight in the early 60s after WWII was long done.

    This is one of those things where you feel stupider because you know it.

  3. Tom Crippen says:

    “… Toro, who had the same powers and was distinguished mostly by being shorter.”

    Noah, that’s pretty much it. Guess there wasn’t much room for variation. But carlosb does point to something: “Seems one on every cover has eyes and one has a blank face.” The kid had the face, the hero had the blank visage. Beats me as to why the difference. Maybe to give the eye some handle for telling them apart, maybe because a kid without a face seems too creepy.

    Roy Thomas dug out the original Human Torch (an android) and refitted him as The Vision, who I think has been a big part of the Marvel universe ever since. But the orig Torch’s personality didn’t make the jump to the Vision. The link is just a matter of the same body getting reworked in a lab, a grace note that Thomas introduced because complicated continuity is fun.