Posts Tagged ‘DC Comics’

Nathan Wilson: An Interview with Geoff Johns Part One (of Two)

Posted by on February 7th, 2011 at 12:01 AM

New York Times best-selling author and Eisner Award-nominated writer Geoff Johns talks to Nathan Wilson about craft; how he writes Green Lantern and The Flash and engineers Infinite Crisis, 52, Blackest Night and Brightest Day; and his career as the Chief Creative Officer for DC Entertainment and supervising production on the 2011 Green Lantern film.

THE PANELISTS: Wednesday Shop Talk

Posted by on January 26th, 2011 at 6:24 PM

Over at The Panelists today, Jared writes about the pall that now enshrouds his weekly trips to comics shops. Because some of us still go through the ritual, even if we’re not entirely sure why anymore.

THE PANELISTS: The Continuity Shuffle

Posted by on January 25th, 2011 at 6:52 PM

Today at The Panelists, Charles Hatfield takes a look at continuity-heavy superhero crossovers/events/crises through the lens of Kurt Busiek and George Perez’s JLA/Avengers. Excerpt: “Okay, so prelapsarian innocence (think DC in the early sixties) can comfortably coexist with angst, moral ambiguity, and post-direct market revisionism. And stories can poach freely from various eras, resulting in complexity and irony. Sure, why not?”

THE PANELISTS: Power Girl and All Star Comics

Posted by on January 4th, 2011 at 5:28 AM

Over at The Panelists today, I continue our One-Panel Criticism relay with a look at a Wally Wood panel from All Star Comics #59 (1976).

Freddie E. Williams II Talks Digital Part 2 of 2

Posted by on December 14th, 2010 at 12:02 AM

In the conclusion of this two-part interview with Freddie E. Williams II, conducted by Nathan Wilson, the artist talks about working within DC’s editorial structure, his collaboration process and criticism.

Freddie E. Williams II Talks Digital Part 1 of 2

Posted by on December 13th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Freddie E. Williams II’s broke into the “big two” came with Grant Morrison’s four-issue Seven Soldiers of Victory: Mister Miracle #2. In addition to his continued DC work with Robin, Freddie illustrated one-shots and shorter runs on titles such as 52, Firestorm: The Nuclear Man, The Outsiders, Blue Beetle, Countdown and The Flash. In 2009, Williams teamed with Matt Sturges on DC’s six-issue Final Crisis Aftermath: Run! and in early 2010 continued with Sturges on JSA All-Stars for 11 issues. Williams attributes his success and abilities to his 1999 conversion from traditional pencil-and-ink work to a completely digital art environment. Working digitally for more than years now, a transition and process that he describes in great detail with instructions and guidance in his The DC Comics Guide to Digitally Drawing Comics (2009), Williams took time away from his hectic schedule to speak with me about his digital canvas artwork and to record a video of his process. — Nathan Wilson

To view the accompanying video, click here.

Paul Levitz Talks About 75 Years of DC Comics (Part Three of Three)

Posted by on December 8th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Nathan Wilson talks to the former DC Comics publisher about DC’s eventful 1980s and the coming of royalties for creators.

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Paul Levitz Talks About 75 Years of DC Comics (Part Two of Three)

Posted by on December 7th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Nathan Wilson speaks with the former DC Comics publisher about the “relevant years” and the ways that comics have wrestled with the changing nature of youth culture.

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Paul Levitz Talks About 75 Years of DC Comics (Part One of Three)

Posted by on December 6th, 2010 at 12:01 AM

Nathan Wilson speaks with the former DC Comics publisher about his new book from Taschen, 75 Years of DC Comics: The Art of Modern Mythmaking.

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Posted by on November 7th, 2010 at 6:36 AM

Grant Morrison, Architecture, and Mythology: Batman: Gothic (Legends of the Dark Knight #6-10)

Here and at GutterGeek, I continue to look back at Grant Morrison’s DC Comics superhero work. This time we’re re-reading Batman: Gothic:

Sometimes it’s easy to get so wrapped up in subtext, allusions, and external meaning that I forget to recognize when a story is just good. At its core, that’s what Batman: Gothic is. It’s a really well-told story. Whereas Arkham Asylum was an effective psychological examination without much plot to speak of, Gothic is a plot-driven mystery with a healthy dose of action, adventure, and crime drama thrown in….

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